Documentation

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/12/04/118/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/12/04/114/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/12/03/110/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/made-in-roath-2017/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/hampshire-open-studios/

Contextualisation

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/06/65/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/59/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/55/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/05/51/

https://elysiahendricksblog.wordpress.com/2017/11/06/philippa-hadley-choy/

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Experiments with figurative sculpture.

These quick steel works were first attempts at semi abstract figurative sculptures. Made with scrap materials and done in very little time, the priority here was getting the impression of a person over a literal representation. Balance and line are important parts of what I am trying to achieve in my practise so I believe the bust like piece on the left was the most successful.

I will carry on with experiments in this area as I think there is potential for a larger or more intricate piece in the future.

 

This small experiment is a carry on of last years look at imbalanced sculptures, specifically the geometric final pieces. The intention was to give the impression of instability both physically and on a personal level; politically, socially or emotionally.

It had been suggested that the imbalance could relate to the current social climate i.e. Brexit and the disillusion of capitalism. I’m unsure if i want to go down this route officially and am currently only trying to create that sense of unease in the audience.

Artist statement

With a long standing interest in Metal and Sculpture, my work is an experimentation of space and form. In the last year I have put emphasis on the importance of balance in sculpture, both physically and visually, which has led to a series of pieces examining the subject.  A large part of my interest is in the emphasis on process and the involvement of industrial and traditional methods.

As well as being influenced by contemporary artists such as Anthony Caro, I also have a heavy enthusiasm for the emotive work of mid-20th century British sculptors such as Reg Butler, Kenneth Armitage and Robert Adams.

Jan Fabre- Glass and Bone Sculptures

Jan Fabre

Glass and Bone sculptures

1977-2017

 

An exhibition in the Biennale that stood out was that of Jan Fabre, a multi-disciplinary Belgian artist, whose work filled the rooms of the former abbey of San Gregorio.  Made of glass and bone, his sculptures included birds in the rafters and carefully positioned animal skeletons in the mouths of glass skulls.

I have included this exhibition in my contextualisation as an example of layout rather than concept, the work involved the whole building so the positioning of several pieces were of note.  Displayed on the ground floor were a collection of glass sculptures and real animal skeletons cordoned off from the spectator. Whether this was for safety purposes or not, it directs the viewer and limits the audiences interaction with the work.

The glass pigeons were also interesting for their positioning in the rafters.